Daily Archives: 2016-01-27

Snowzilla!

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After shoveling the driveway several times and burning through the Netflix que, one way to counter act cabin fever is to hunt down some snowfall data and play around with it.  So, I found some data over at the National Weather Service that contains snowfall depth measurements collected from a variety of sources around the region at various time points during the storm.

The map shows the maximum snowfall depth at any given location recorded from Friday until Sunday.  The deepest measurements are labeled. The area near West Virginia clearly bore the brunt of the storm, but there were some areas closer to DC that came close.  Everyone pretty much got a lot of snow.

snowzilla_mapBrunel Code:

map('usa') + x(Lat) y(Lon) max(Snowfall) color(Snowfall:blues) tooltip(City,Snowfall) style("stroke-width:0;opacity:.4;size:15px") + 
map('labels')  + x(Lat) y(Lon) max(Snowfall) top(Snowfall:10)  label(Snowfall, '"') text style("font-family:Impact;fill:darkblue") tooltip(City,Snowfall)

Apparently there was a bit of controversy regarding the exact snowfall measurement at Washington National Airport.  To try to look at this, I added a timeline graph that is linked to the map so I could see the snowfall amounts at different time points.  The data are binned to roughly 2 hours and these bins are colored by the number of measurements taken within the time range.  Clicking on a bin shows the measurements on the map–and I zoomed in to the airport.  I do not appear to have all the data showing the issue; but, I can see measurements in nearby areas and who did them.  Perhaps the upshot was that the difference is significant for historical and business reasons–but it probably won’t make your back feel much better.

snowzilla_zoom_mapBrunel Code:

map('usa') at(0,0,100,75) + x(Lat) y(Lon) size(Snowfall:200%) max(Snowfall) color(Source) label(Snowfall,City) tooltip(Snowfall, City, Source) interaction(filter)  at(0,0,100,75) + map(labels)  at(0,0,100,75) |  x(Time) bin(Time:20) color(#selection) opacity(#count) interaction(select) tooltip(Time)  at(0,85,100,100)

Since the storm lasted nearly 36 hours, it can also be interesting to look at the depths over time.  The variable sized paths below show that the snow generally started to really pile up Friday night and also that Maryland and West Virginia seemed to reach their peak a little bit sooner than Virginia.  The boxes that are overlaid on the paths show the number of measurements that were taken at binned time intervals.  More measurements were taken in Virgina and Maryland–and most measurements seem to have been taken towards the end of the major accumulation.

snowzilla_time

Brunel Code:

path x(Time) y(State) color(State) bin(Time:20)  size(Snowfall) max(Snowfall) legends(none) + x(Time) y(State) color(#count) bin(Time:30) style('height:20px')

Lastly, if you are familiar with the area, you’ll quickly recognize the county names.  Below is a cloud with county names sized by the max snowfall depths and colored by their state.  Counties with larger snowfall amounts appear more towards the center.  Most names are nearly the same size because everyone got a lot of snow!

snowzilla_cloud

Brunel Code:

cloud color(State) size(Snowfall:150%) label(County) max(Snowfall) sort(Snowfall)  style('.element {font-family:Impact;}')