Category Archives: Programming

Using Brunel in IPython/Jupyter Notebooks

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Analytics and visualization often go hand-in-hand.  One of the great things about notebooks such as IPython/Jupyter is that they provide a single interface to numerous data analysis technologies that often can be used together.  So, using Brunel within notebooks is a very natural fit.  For example, I can use a wide variety of python libraries to cleanse, shape and analyze data–and then use Brunel to visualize those results.

Additionally, coming up with a good visualization is a highly iterative process:  Try something, look at the results and refine until done.   So, again, the notebook metaphor of having live code execution near the results is extremely convenient.  Lastly, since notebook cells containing output can themselves be interactive, direct manipulation techniques such as brushing/linking, filtering and selection are also available.

To try this out, we have provided an integration of Brunel for Python 3 that runs in IPython/Jupyter notebooks.  Details on how to install and get started are on the PyPI site.  The video above gives a very small taste of the kinds of things that are possible.

 

Brunel: Open Source Visualization Language

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BRUNEL is a high-level language that describes visualizations in terms of composable actions. It drives a visualization engine (d3) that performs the actual rendering and interactivity. It provides a language that is as simple as possible to describe a wide variety of potential charts, and to allow them to be used in Java, Javascript, python and R systems that want to deliver web-based interactive visualizations.


At the end of the article are a list of resources, but first, some examples. The dataset I am using for these is a set of data taken from BoardGameGeek which I processed to create a data set describing the top 2000 games listed as of Spring 2015. Each chart below is a fully interactive visualization running in its own frame. I’ve added the brunel description for each chart below each image as a caption, so you can go to the Builder anytime and copy the command into the edit box to try out new things.

data('sample:BGG Top 2000 Games.csv') bubble color(rating) size(voters) sort(rating) label(title) tooltip(title, #all) legends(none) style('* {font-size: 7pt}') top(rating:100)

This shows the top 100 games, with a tooltip view for details on the games. They are packed together in a layout where the location has no strong meaning
— the goal is to show as much data in as small a space as possible!
In the builder, you can change the number in top(rating:100) to show the top 1000, 2000 … or show the bottom 100. You could also add x(numplayers) to divide up the groups by recommended number of players

data('sample:BGG Top 2000 Games.csv') line x(published) y(categories) color(categories) size(voters:200) opacity(#selection) sort(categories) top(published:1900) sum(voters) legends(none) | data('sample:BGG Top 2000 Games.csv') bar y(voters) stack polar color(playerage) label(playerage) sum(voters) legends(none) at(15, 60, 40, 90) interaction(select:mouseover)

This example shows some live interactive features; hover over the pie chart to update the main chart. The main chart shows the number of people voting for games in different categories over time, and the pie chart shows the recommended minimum age to enjoy a game. So when you hover over ‘6’, for example, you can see that there have been no good sci-fi games for younger players in the last 10 years. Use the mouse to pan and zoom the chart (drag to pan, double-click to zoom).

data('sample:BGG Top 2000 Games.csv') treemap x(designer, mechanics) color(rating) size(#count) label(published) tooltip(#all, title) mean(rating) min(published) list(title:50) legends(none)

Head to the Builder Site to modify this. You could try:

  • change the list of fields in x(…) — reorder then or use fields like ‘numplayers’, ‘language’
  • remove the ‘legends(none)’ command to show a legend
  • change size to ‘voters’ — and add a ‘sum(voters)’ command to show the total number of voters rather than just counts for each treemap tile

Do you want to know more?

Follow links below; gallery and cookbook examples will take you to the Brunel Builder Site where you can create your own visualizations and grab some Javascript code to embed them in your web pages … which is exactly how I built the above examples!

iTunes Music to Data, via Python

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Music Treemap

8000+ iTunes songs by genre and artist, colored by rating (ManyEyes version)

The track information stored in iTunes is pretty interesting from a visualization point of view, as it contains dates, durations, categories, groupings — all the sorts of things that make for complex, interesting data to look at.The only issue is … it’s in iTunes, and I’d like to get a CSV version of it so I can use it in a bunch of tools.

So, here is the result; a couple of Python scripts that use standard libraries to read the XML file exported by iTunes and convert it to CSV. It’s not general or robust code, just some script that worked for me and should be pretty easy to modify for you. I’m not a Pythonista, mostly doing Java, so apologies for non-idiomatic usage. Feel free to correct or suggest in the comments as this is also a learning exercise for me.

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